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FBO DAILY ISSUE OF JULY 16, 2010 FBO #3156
SOLICITATION NOTICE

B -- RESEARCH REPORT ON HAWAIIAN MONK SEALS IN NATIVE HAWAIIAN CULTURE

Notice Date
7/14/2010
 
Notice Type
Combined Synopsis/Solicitation
 
NAICS
541620 — Environmental Consulting Services
 
Contracting Office
Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), NOAA/National Marine Fisheries Service, James J. Howard Marine Sciences Lab, 74 Magruder Road, Highlands, New Jersey, 07732, United States
 
ZIP Code
07732
 
Solicitation Number
PIRO-10-0558
 
Archive Date
8/13/2010
 
Point of Contact
Denise Rogers, Phone: 808-944-2208
 
E-Mail Address
DENISE.ROGERS@NOAA.GOV
(DENISE.ROGERS@NOAA.GOV)
 
Small Business Set-Aside
N/A
 
Description
Project: Research Report on Hawaiian Monk Seals in Native Hawaiian Culture. STATEMENT OF WORK 1. Background The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), Pacific Islands Regional Office (PIRO), Protected Resources Division (PRD) is responsible for protecting and recovering endangered and threatened species of sea turtles, monk seals, and cetaceans as mandated by the Endangered Species Act (ESA) and Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA). Through management, conservation and recovery efforts, and public outreach and education, PRD strives to ensure the recovery and survival of the protected marine species of the Pacific Islands Region for future generations. Currently, recovery of the endangered Hawaiian monk seal is a high priority for NMFS. Although the overall population of Hawaiian monk seals is in decline, their numbers appear to be increasing in the main Hawaiian Islands (MHI). This increase is particularly important for monk seal recovery. In 2009, three monk seals were shot to death, in what appear to be intentional killings. It has been revealed in public meetings and other venues that a significant number of people in the MHI have unfavorable views about monk seals and consider the seals to be a threat to fishery-based livelihoods. Among some Native Hawaiians, a belief has been expressed that Hawaiian monk seals have never naturally occurred in the MHI. Accordingly, they believe monk seals have no part in their natural or cultural heritage. Some Hawaiians, therefore, believe they have no responsibility to protect monk seals. Some information, however, suggests that Hawaiian culture was once connected to monk seals. Evidence of this connection has not been thoroughly examined or compiled. If past presence of seals in the MHI and/or a meaningful cultural significance of monk seals in Hawaiian culture could be documented, Native Hawaiians who now consider monk seals to be an introduced species may change their views and the Native Hawaiian community at large would perhaps be more accepting and supportive of monk seal conservation. The purpose of this project is to produce a research report on the significance Hawaiian monk seals in Native Hawaiian culture. This project is considered by NMFS as a step towards facilitating an informed dialogue with Native Hawaiians regarding their most appropriate role in monk seal protection. The report will provide information that can be used to share with Native Hawaiians and others about Hawaiian monk seals in traditional Hawaiian culture. Such information could help lay a foundation for discussing the possibility of monk seal conservation as part of Native Hawaiian community activities and priorities. The report also will provide new information of historical importance for management documents such as recovery plans and public outreach materials. 2. Scope and Objectives The goal of this study is to prepare a report summarizing information regarding the significance of Hawaiian monk seals in Native Hawaiian culture. The study will compile and describe references from various sources regarding the presence and history of Hawaiian monk seals in the MHI and/or the traditional Hawaiian value, use, or other significance of seals, if any. Specific objectives of this study are to compile, analyze, and report relevant information from: • A literature search of academic texts and other scholarly documents • A search for records in Hawaiian language newspapers • Traditional knowledge within the Native Hawaiian community, revealed via various sources including ethnographic interviews with Hawaiian elders and cultural experts To achieve these objectives, PRD requires a Contractor who is a widely recognized as an expert and scholar of Native Hawaiian culture, history, traditions, and practices. The scope of work includes conducting ethnographic research via gathering, compiling, and analyzing primary and secondary information from a variety of sources, and presenting the results of the research in a report that is thorough, academically rigorous, and understandable to a diverse range of readers. The research report delivered via this contract will be used by NMFS and its partners to enhance Hawaiian monk seal recovery program efforts. 3. Tasks The Contractor shall perform the following tasks: Task 1. Conduct initial project inception meeting and maintain regular contact with PRD Before initiating significant work on the project, the Contractor shall convene a meeting with the technical point-of-contact staff person(s) designated by PRD to discuss the overall strategy of the project, possible information sources, and other aspects of the project. The Contractor shall also contact PRD regularly (at least once every two weeks) via email or telephone to provide a brief update on the progress of the project. Task 2. Conduct extensive literature search The Contractor shall conduct an extensive literature search within academic texts and other scholarly sources for evidence and/or descriptions of Hawaiian monk seals in the MHI prior to the 1970's, as well as any significance of Hawaiian monk seals in Native Hawaiian culture at any time in the past. Evidence of cultural significance shall include, but not be limited to, reference in Hawaiian historical accounts, chants (mele), prayers (oli), oral histories, and other traditional and customary practices. All relevant references found during the literature search shall be summarized and compiled for presentation in the report described in Task 5 below. All literature sources yielding relevant information shall be cited in a standard and consistent manner to facilitate future retrieval if desired. The Bishop Museum and the University of Hawaii library systems shall be searched, among other repositories. Task 3. Conduct search of Hawaiian language newspapers The Contractor shall search within Hawaiian language newspapers that were published primarily in the 19th and early 20th centuries for evidence and/or descriptions of Hawaiian monk seals in the MHI and/or their significance in Hawaiian culture. All relevant references found during the newspaper search shall be summarized and compiled for presentation in the report described in Task 5 below. All newspaper articles yielding relevant information shall be cited in a standard and consistent manner to facilitate future retrieval if desired. The Bishop Museum and the University of Hawaii library systems shall be searched, among other repositories. Task 4. Conduct interviews of Hawaiian cultural experts and elders The Contractor shall conduct ethnographic interviews with experts in Hawaiian culture and with Hawaiian elders (kupuna) who may have traditional knowledge regarding Hawaiian monk seals and their significance in Hawaiian culture. Interview results shall be documented and summarized by the Contractor for presentation in the report described in Task 5 below. Task 5. Prepare and submit a report summarizing the results of Tasks 1 - 3 The Contractor shall prepare and submit a report summarizing the results of the work conducted in Tasks 1 - 4 above. A draft report shall be submitted to PRD for review and comment. PRD will conduct its review and provide comments regarding the draft report to the Contractor within 21 days after receipt by PRD of the draft report. The Contractor shall consider, address, and/or incorporate PRD's comments on the draft report to the maximum extent practicable in preparing the final version of the report for submittal to PRD. Copyrights and intellectual property rights associated with the report shall be consistent with the terms and conditions specified in the NOAA procurement award document provided to the Contractor. The report shall include, but not be limited to the following sections: • Title Page • Executive Summary • Table of Contents • Results of Literature Search • Results of Newspaper Search • Results of Interviews • Synthesis and Analysis of Results • Recommendations and Implications for NMFS Hawaiian Monk Seal Recovery Program • Sources, Citations, References, Etc. Task 6. Work in collaboration with other NMFS contractors and grantees working on Hawaiian monk seal recovery The Contractor shall work in collaboration and coordination with other NMFS contractors and grantees to support Hawaiian monk seal recovery. The Contractor shall participate in a meeting convened by NMFS and attended by NMFS staff and other NMFS contractors and grantees to develop a collaborative approach. The collaborative approach will include, but not be limited to, mechanisms to ensure that the deliverables and services provided by each contractor and grantee are complementary and not duplicative. 4. Deliverables Deliverable Due Date (days after contract award date. See Section 7 for project start date.) 1. Task 1: project inception meeting 30 days 2. Tasks 2 - 4: literature and newspaper searches, and interviews 120 days 3. Task 5: draft report for PRD review and comment 150 days 4. Task 5: final report 210 days 5. Government Furnished Property PRD will supply to the Contractor upon request copies of available relevant PRD reports, documentation, and digital media of previous PRD work regarding the Task 5 report subject matter. 6. Information Security in Acquisitions Data supplied for and produced by this contract is not privileged and the level of security required is low. The C&A requirements of clause 73 do not apply and a Security Accreditation Package is not required. 7. Project Start Date and Period of Performance Work on the project shall be initiated on or before September 13, 2010, with deliverables delivered to NMFS as specified in Section 4 above. The period of performance for this project is 210 days. Evaluation Criteria and Basis for Award Minimum Qualifications The offeror must have a minimum of two years experience conducting ethnographic research regarding Hawaiian and/or Polynesian culture. Basis for Award The basis for award of a contract as a result of this Request for Proposal will be an integrated assessment by the Government of the results of the evaluation based on the evaluation factors listed below. Technical and past performance considerations are more important than cost. The three categories and criteria are weighted as indicated below. I. Technical Approach (30%) The offerors' proposals shall show the offerors' organization and plan for successfully executing the Statement of Work. Proposals must address the organization's approach for each evaluation factor: 1) The approach to working in effective collaboration with PIRO PRD to meet the requirements stated in the Statement of Work. 2) The approach to accessing, compiling, and analyzing the information sources specified in Tasks 2, 3, and 4 in the Statement of Work. 3) The approach to producing the research report specified in Task 5 in the Statement of Work II. Capacity and Past Performance (50%) The offeror must provide evidence that they have the capacity and experience to complete the project. Contact information for previous clients and employers should be provided. Proposals must address the organization's qualifications for each evaluation factor. 1) Experience conducting ethnographic research of academic texts and other scholarly documents regarding Native Hawaiian culture. 2) Experience conducting ethnographic interviews with experts and Hawaiian elders regarding Hawaiian culture. 3) Experience producing thorough, informative and useful ethnographic research reports. 4) Availability of adequate personnel, time, and resources to complete the project and produce the deliverables on or before the due dates specified in the Statement of Work. III. Cost (20%) Each cost proposal in the competitive range will be subjected to a cost evaluation. For the purposes of this procurement, technical factors and past performance are considered more important than cost. However, in the event the proposals of two or more offerors receive comparable technical scores, cost may be used to determine which offer provides the best value to the Government. Cost proposals should include categories for salary, including rates, travel, supplies and expenses, overhead or profit, and others as needed to fully describe the cost of implementing the proposed work plan. Any expenses or tasks which are optional should be so indicated.
 
Web Link
FBO.gov Permalink
(https://www.fbo.gov/spg/DOC/NOAA/NMFSJJ/PIRO-10-0558/listing.html)
 
Record
SN02206343-W 20100716/100714235659-98355d86466323679b72856072ce8bc1 (fbodaily.com)
 
Source
FedBizOpps Link to This Notice
(may not be valid after Archive Date)

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